Sun-Moon Lake rosella, oolong, tea-oil and konjac porridge

Taiwanese hand-rolled high-altitude oolong tea, brown rice, tea oil, konjac and rosellas flowers boiled in honey were given to me by my friend Wendy who has just returned from her mothers country.

“This tea is magic,” she told me as we sat like Tang dynasty daoists by the babbling brook that flows past her Saikung home, feet in the water as I poured thermos water over the tea.
I felt the energy of the lake and the beautiful people was infused into these leaves , told Wendy, who spent time in Indigenous Taiwanese’ run organicly-oriented farms around Sun Moon Lake.

A Network Chiropracter and a food lover, currently studying the  art of raw -cheffing, Wendy is an intuitive creator. A  porridge recipe from her experieneces in Taiwan is a priority for this blog.
In the meantime I will intuit on her behalf with this experimental recipe.

Sun Moon Rosella Oolong Konjac and RicePorridge.
Prepare tea – gongfu style – steeped briefly and poured before it gets bitter. Keep aside. I kept the leaves from the babbling brook as there still were several washes left in them.
Boil rice in water – left over cooked rice  is perfect.
Add rosellas and dark honey.
Add the strained green tea.
Let it cool and add  the tiniest amount of tea oil.

Health Benefits
If it tastes good, it is good for you on an emotional level, states Wendy.
Rosellas are claimed to  lower blood pressure, tonify the blood, cure cancers (wow), anti oxidise ,  promotes urinary tract health, cal,a nervous disposiotion.
Tea oil is called the olive oil of china – cholestrol reducing, anti oxidant. omega rich. Reference
Konjac: Heaps o fibre – sweps your intestines and normalises cholestrol claims this site: Reference

Verdict

Deliciously tart alleviated by bursts of mollases soaked Konjac. The chewy and  non gloopy brown rice cooperates with the pithy textured rosella flowers, but it is the sensous mouth feel of the konjac that steals  the lime light. I poured too much tea oil on  but drank this off,  the tartness  of the rosellas kindly cleaned the oil from my palette leaving an aftertaste of  zing.

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